Presenter Information

Amber N. Nickell, History

Description

Using ArcGIS software and the ArcGIS online story mapping function, this project maps population growth and decline over time in the ethnic German Volga and Black Sea Enclaves in the Russian Empire (later the USSR) and overlays that population data with maps of famine zones during the 1891/2, 1921/22, and 1932/33 famines in order to answer the following questions. Where were the enclaves in relation to the famine regions? What impact did the famines have on ethnic German populations in the region? How did the Volga colonies fare in relation to national estimates during naturally occurring famines? During the manmade famines of 1921 and 1933? The primary purpose of this research is description. It functions as a visual demonstration of the Volga Germans situationally within famine zones and an expression of sharp population decline after the famines. It also seeks to explore the idea that the Volga Germans may have fared better than those outside of the enclaves during natural famines and worse during the Soviet manmade famines, which targeted unruly nationals and wealthy farmers. A finding like this would indicate geographic intentionality and ethnic targeting.

Two ethnic organizations in the United States has already compiled a majority of the census data for the Volga enclaves; the Black Sea data is incomplete. Moreover, historical maps of the famine areas and colony locations are available in both digital and print formats. Via the map overlay function, these maps will be used to determine the geographic parameters of the famine zones. /

Location

Stewart Center, Room 218

Start Date

11-2015

Document Type

Event

Keywords

Volga, Black Sea, Germans, Famine, Russian Empire, Soviet Union

Session List

poster

Share

COinS
 
Nov 1st, 12:00 AM

Mapping the Impact of Famine on the Volga and Black Sea German Enclaves, 1891-1934

Stewart Center, Room 218

Using ArcGIS software and the ArcGIS online story mapping function, this project maps population growth and decline over time in the ethnic German Volga and Black Sea Enclaves in the Russian Empire (later the USSR) and overlays that population data with maps of famine zones during the 1891/2, 1921/22, and 1932/33 famines in order to answer the following questions. Where were the enclaves in relation to the famine regions? What impact did the famines have on ethnic German populations in the region? How did the Volga colonies fare in relation to national estimates during naturally occurring famines? During the manmade famines of 1921 and 1933? The primary purpose of this research is description. It functions as a visual demonstration of the Volga Germans situationally within famine zones and an expression of sharp population decline after the famines. It also seeks to explore the idea that the Volga Germans may have fared better than those outside of the enclaves during natural famines and worse during the Soviet manmade famines, which targeted unruly nationals and wealthy farmers. A finding like this would indicate geographic intentionality and ethnic targeting.

Two ethnic organizations in the United States has already compiled a majority of the census data for the Volga enclaves; the Black Sea data is incomplete. Moreover, historical maps of the famine areas and colony locations are available in both digital and print formats. Via the map overlay function, these maps will be used to determine the geographic parameters of the famine zones. /