Proposed Submission Title

Perceptions of Ally Confrontations

Presenter Information

Celine JusufFollow

Keywords

confrontation, bias, stereotyping, race, belonging, safety, prejudice

Select the category the research project fits.

Social Sciences/Humanities

Is this submission part of ICaP/PW (Introductory Composition at Purdue/Professional Writing)?

No

Abstract

Research related to interpersonal confrontations, where one person points out a way in which another person had engaged in stereotypical or prejudicial bias, has provided a wealth of knowledge about factors that influence the extent to which confrontations reduce bias (e.g., Czopp, Monteith, & Mark, 2006; Chaney & Sanchez, 2017; Mallet & Wagner, 2011; Parker, Monteith, Moss-Racusin, & Van Camp, 2018). However, how do minority-group members perceive confrontations on behalf of their social/ethnic group, and does group membership of the confronter matter? The present experiment investigates how Asian women perceive confrontations of prejudice against their group when performed by an Asian woman, White woman, or Black woman. We are especially interested in testing whether confrontations provide contextual cues to safety (Wout, Murphy, & Sabrica, 2014) signaling that Asian women are valued and belong in a given setting. We examine whether the greater the amount of social identity overlap between the Asian women participants and the confronter, the greater safety and belonging participants will feel in the setting in which the confrontation took place. Results indicate that biased remarks without confrontation significantly lower participants’ sense of belonging within a group along with other dependent variables compared to a condition in which no biased remark is made. Confrontations do not significantly heighten these results and serve as a safety cue, but White confronters show a tendency to be marginally effective at increasing these dependent variables.

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Perceptions of Ally Confrontations

Research related to interpersonal confrontations, where one person points out a way in which another person had engaged in stereotypical or prejudicial bias, has provided a wealth of knowledge about factors that influence the extent to which confrontations reduce bias (e.g., Czopp, Monteith, & Mark, 2006; Chaney & Sanchez, 2017; Mallet & Wagner, 2011; Parker, Monteith, Moss-Racusin, & Van Camp, 2018). However, how do minority-group members perceive confrontations on behalf of their social/ethnic group, and does group membership of the confronter matter? The present experiment investigates how Asian women perceive confrontations of prejudice against their group when performed by an Asian woman, White woman, or Black woman. We are especially interested in testing whether confrontations provide contextual cues to safety (Wout, Murphy, & Sabrica, 2014) signaling that Asian women are valued and belong in a given setting. We examine whether the greater the amount of social identity overlap between the Asian women participants and the confronter, the greater safety and belonging participants will feel in the setting in which the confrontation took place. Results indicate that biased remarks without confrontation significantly lower participants’ sense of belonging within a group along with other dependent variables compared to a condition in which no biased remark is made. Confrontations do not significantly heighten these results and serve as a safety cue, but White confronters show a tendency to be marginally effective at increasing these dependent variables.