Location

Purdue University

Event Website

http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~pla2006/symposium/2015/index.html

Description

The role of antonymy in semantic change is investigated via the etymology of sets of English antonyms. The results show a developmental pattern wherein two words sharing an antonym tend to exhibit similar trajectories of semantic development. Metaphorical extension is proposed as the primary mechanism that produces this regularity with antonymy playing a secondary role. These results further support semantic change as regular, even in contexts not involving grammaticalization, and that furthermore, metaphor is not peripheral to language use. (See Lakoff & Johnson, 1980; Traugott & Dasher, 2002; Hopper & Traugott, 2003.) There are also implications for formal and cognitive representations that rely on antonymous relationships for modeling aspects of gradable predicates (such as Paradis, 2001; Kennedy & McNally, 2005).

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Apr 10th, 4:30 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 AM

The Role of Antonymy on Semantic Change

Purdue University

The role of antonymy in semantic change is investigated via the etymology of sets of English antonyms. The results show a developmental pattern wherein two words sharing an antonym tend to exhibit similar trajectories of semantic development. Metaphorical extension is proposed as the primary mechanism that produces this regularity with antonymy playing a secondary role. These results further support semantic change as regular, even in contexts not involving grammaticalization, and that furthermore, metaphor is not peripheral to language use. (See Lakoff & Johnson, 1980; Traugott & Dasher, 2002; Hopper & Traugott, 2003.) There are also implications for formal and cognitive representations that rely on antonymous relationships for modeling aspects of gradable predicates (such as Paradis, 2001; Kennedy & McNally, 2005).

https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/plas/2015/proceedings/1