Keywords

project-based learning, computational fluid dynamics, engineering design

Abstract

A transportable “endless pool” device to improve the speed, endurance, and stroke techniques of swimmers is being developed. To guide our design processes, we used the implementation of the Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) methodology. The “endless pool” will create a non-turbulent swim current that allows stationary swimming. It will be a high-volume propellor system which has a variable speed to help all ranges of swimmers. After researching existing devices, we created CAD designs that were used in computational fluid dynamics simulations to optimize performance parameters like backflow, turbulence, and device dimensions. From the initial simulation results, we addressed the backflow by creating a novel design.

We then 3D printed a scaled model of our design and plan to test whether the scaled numbers are reliable, and the flow is laminar. To test this we had created a scaled model of the pool. Inside the scaled model we installed false walls to attempt to create a circular flow that will keep it as laminar as possible. If the false walls in the models simulation are reliable, we plan to use them in our final design.

In the new UIndy “endless pool” swimmers can view their mirror reflection and video replays to analyze and improve their own technique. In addition to swimmer improvement, the University of Indianapolis Kinesiology department will be able to conduct research on the swimmers’ stroke technique.

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Poster Final Draft

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(POSTER) Design and Construction of a Transportable Swimming Pool Flume to Aid in the Development UIndy Swimmers

A transportable “endless pool” device to improve the speed, endurance, and stroke techniques of swimmers is being developed. To guide our design processes, we used the implementation of the Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) methodology. The “endless pool” will create a non-turbulent swim current that allows stationary swimming. It will be a high-volume propellor system which has a variable speed to help all ranges of swimmers. After researching existing devices, we created CAD designs that were used in computational fluid dynamics simulations to optimize performance parameters like backflow, turbulence, and device dimensions. From the initial simulation results, we addressed the backflow by creating a novel design.

We then 3D printed a scaled model of our design and plan to test whether the scaled numbers are reliable, and the flow is laminar. To test this we had created a scaled model of the pool. Inside the scaled model we installed false walls to attempt to create a circular flow that will keep it as laminar as possible. If the false walls in the models simulation are reliable, we plan to use them in our final design.

In the new UIndy “endless pool” swimmers can view their mirror reflection and video replays to analyze and improve their own technique. In addition to swimmer improvement, the University of Indianapolis Kinesiology department will be able to conduct research on the swimmers’ stroke technique.