Location

West Lafafayette, Indiana

Abstract

Development of new effective laboratory experiences to extend and reinforce knowledge from lectures plays an essential role in engineering technology education. This paper will address a set of labs based on hardness testing. A common mechanical property test, hardness testing measures the indent penetration or other surface characteristics of materials based on the hardness test type. The laboratory procedures and the testing specimens follow appropriate standards for materials testing. In an introductory materials course for the manufacturing and mechanical engineering technology degree programs at the campuses of Purdue University, polymer specimens are tested for their Shore Durometer hardness. The quality and manufacture of the specimens directly affects the final hardness test results. To help students understand this polymer property and the importance of the specimens’ respective manufacturing processes, samples made of the same material and size, but by different production methods were evaluated. Student tasks spanned polymer specimen design, processing, testing, and analysis. Sample production approaches and comparison of hardness values corresponding to each process are discussed for several polymer materials. Changes in student understanding of variability and their interest in experimental research will be explored.

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Hardness Comparison of Polymer Specimens Produced with Different Processes

West Lafafayette, Indiana

Development of new effective laboratory experiences to extend and reinforce knowledge from lectures plays an essential role in engineering technology education. This paper will address a set of labs based on hardness testing. A common mechanical property test, hardness testing measures the indent penetration or other surface characteristics of materials based on the hardness test type. The laboratory procedures and the testing specimens follow appropriate standards for materials testing. In an introductory materials course for the manufacturing and mechanical engineering technology degree programs at the campuses of Purdue University, polymer specimens are tested for their Shore Durometer hardness. The quality and manufacture of the specimens directly affects the final hardness test results. To help students understand this polymer property and the importance of the specimens’ respective manufacturing processes, samples made of the same material and size, but by different production methods were evaluated. Student tasks spanned polymer specimen design, processing, testing, and analysis. Sample production approaches and comparison of hardness values corresponding to each process are discussed for several polymer materials. Changes in student understanding of variability and their interest in experimental research will be explored.