Keywords

Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, Ralstonia, Ralstonia solanacearum, plant pathogens, bacterial wilt

Research Abstract

Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne plant root colonizing pathogen and the casual agent of bacterial wilt (BW) disease. BW leads to severe yield loss in a wide variety of agricultural commodity crops, such as tomato, banana, and pepper. In this study, we look at the plant-pathogen interaction between Ralstonia solanacearum and various ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana with the goal of finding resistant ecotypes. To identify resistant ecotypes, seeds are first sterilized and left to soak in the dark. Then the seeds are plated on agar media, transferred to a growth chamber, and allowed to grow for 5 days. On day 5, plates are removed from the growth chamber, and plants are transferred to new plates that have been inoculated with or without R. solanacearum, and the root tips are marked. After 5 days, the inoculated plates are scanned and root length after inoculation measured. The vegetative growth is also removed and placed in 95% ethanol for chlorophyll analyses. Based on root growth and chlorophyll analyses, 5 out of 16 ecotypes showed increased resistance to R. solanacearum in comparison to the susceptible control line, Col-0. Identifying resistant ecotypes will allow genetic analysis of resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum, and will enhance our ability to search for homologs of Arabidopsis resistance genes in important agricultural commodity crops.

Session Track

Food, Soil, Plant and Animal Science

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Aug 6th, 12:00 AM

Detecting Genomic Regions Responsible for Resistance in Arabidopsis

Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne plant root colonizing pathogen and the casual agent of bacterial wilt (BW) disease. BW leads to severe yield loss in a wide variety of agricultural commodity crops, such as tomato, banana, and pepper. In this study, we look at the plant-pathogen interaction between Ralstonia solanacearum and various ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana with the goal of finding resistant ecotypes. To identify resistant ecotypes, seeds are first sterilized and left to soak in the dark. Then the seeds are plated on agar media, transferred to a growth chamber, and allowed to grow for 5 days. On day 5, plates are removed from the growth chamber, and plants are transferred to new plates that have been inoculated with or without R. solanacearum, and the root tips are marked. After 5 days, the inoculated plates are scanned and root length after inoculation measured. The vegetative growth is also removed and placed in 95% ethanol for chlorophyll analyses. Based on root growth and chlorophyll analyses, 5 out of 16 ecotypes showed increased resistance to R. solanacearum in comparison to the susceptible control line, Col-0. Identifying resistant ecotypes will allow genetic analysis of resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum, and will enhance our ability to search for homologs of Arabidopsis resistance genes in important agricultural commodity crops.