Keywords

Numerical modelling, Gas turbine engines, Numerical tools, Simulation, Thermodynamics

Research Abstract

In 2014 gas turbine engine has reached a market value of 82.5 billion dollars, of which 59.5% are related to aircraft propulsion. The continuous market expansion attracts more and more the interest of researchers and industries towards the development of accurate numerical techniques to model thermodynamically the entire engine. This practice allows a performance and optimization analysis before the actual experimental testing, reducing the time and required investment in the design of a new engine. In this paper, a recently developed open source numerical tool named “Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems” (T-MATS) is used to assess 0-D models of gas turbine engines. Integration of the latter with an open-source package named Cantera allows the user to have a better model of the combustion process. Simplified gas turbine configurations were investigated and compared with well-documented numerical tools prior to the final implementation with pressure gain combustion. The numerical results at different stations within the engine have presented good consistency between both software.

Session Track

Data Trends and Analysis

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Aug 6th, 12:00 AM

Assessment of Critical Technologies for Gas Turbine Engines Using Numerical Tools

In 2014 gas turbine engine has reached a market value of 82.5 billion dollars, of which 59.5% are related to aircraft propulsion. The continuous market expansion attracts more and more the interest of researchers and industries towards the development of accurate numerical techniques to model thermodynamically the entire engine. This practice allows a performance and optimization analysis before the actual experimental testing, reducing the time and required investment in the design of a new engine. In this paper, a recently developed open source numerical tool named “Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems” (T-MATS) is used to assess 0-D models of gas turbine engines. Integration of the latter with an open-source package named Cantera allows the user to have a better model of the combustion process. Simplified gas turbine configurations were investigated and compared with well-documented numerical tools prior to the final implementation with pressure gain combustion. The numerical results at different stations within the engine have presented good consistency between both software.