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Abstract

In her article, "Agency and Political Engagement in Gide and Barrault's Post-war Theatrical Adaptation of Kafka's The Trial" Yevgenya Strakovsky considers the political themes of André Gide and Jean-Louis Barrault's Le Procès (The Trial, 1947), the first theatrical adaptation of Franz Kafka's Der Prozess (The Trial, 1914). Strakovsky demonstrates that Le Procès, written and staged in the immediate aftermath of World War II, levels a critique against the passive complicity of citizens in unjust persecution in both its script and its staging. The paper also considers the elements of Kafka's prose that lend themselves to a socially engaged adaptation, and demonstrates that the Gide-Barrault production perpetuates a call to action that is present in Kafka's novel formally and thematically. Strakovsky concludes by suggesting that political adaptations of Kafka's The Trial provide a vital discursive space to examine the nature of, and need for, postmodern agency.