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Abstract

In her article "Generative Translation in Spicer, Gelman, and Hawkey" Lisa Rose Bradford examines the practice of generative translation — a concept she designated — in Jack Spicer's After Lorca (1957), Juan Gelman's Com/positions (1986), and Christian Hawkey's Ventrakl (2010) to show how this strategy revives the original articulation as a continuation of the seminal frisson while producing an entirely new work of art and one that reflects the genius of both the original and translating authors. While generative translation represents a renovative strategy that has provided historically a constant creative force in literature, in recent years it has established a particularly fruitful, transnational space for writing in which seemingly paratextual elements, forming a confabulation of sorts, encapsulate and color the reworked texts thus modeling the entire reading process.