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Abstract

In her article "Hearing the Cry in Black Diasporic and Latina/o Poetics" Rachel Ellis Neyra expands upon Edouard Glissant's notion of "the cry of the Plantation" and shows how to listen for it in literary arrangement of Derek Walcott, Piri Thomas, Pedro Pietri, Ralph Ellison, Miguel Algarín, and James Baldwin. Ellis Neyra also reads musical lyrics by Oscar D'León and Billie Holiday and the melodic nuances of salsa, jazz, the blues, and bomba for how they sound out what she calls the New World Cry, a mnemonic figure of the Plantation of the Americas and a metaphor for how estrangement can conjoin the desires of (im)migrant and diasporic peoples. In doing so, Ellis Neyra shows that modernity is constituted by aurally sensible, visible, and legible forms which emerged from the plantation and that slavery's breakdown in the Americas did not mark the plantation's erasure, but fermented remainders which carried out its tropological and physical exportation and re-presentation elsewhere.