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Abstract

In her article "The Narration of Transnational Territory in Kingston's China Men and Kim's 검은 꽃 (Black Flower)" Ju Young Jin analyzes Maxine Hong Kingston's and Young-Ha Kim's novels both of which feature East Asian indentured workers in the U.S. and Mexico, respectively. Jin traces the way in which the transnational subjects in the two novels create a textual territory by displacing national histories in a period that has witnessed an increase in indentured workers from East Asia to American continents. Kim creates an apocryphal history of the Korean presence in the New World reimagining the forgotten past by interweaving actual historical facts and Kingston narrates the story of Chinese indentured workers who inaugurate a new cultural tradition in their exiled land to make it their home. Both writers narrate displacement, which Jin reads as "deterritorialization" (Deleuze and Guattari) in order to ground their protagonists in a new space unbound by national territories. For Kingston and Kim creating textual territory is tantamount to legitimation of their own views of literature and the history of immigration in the U.S.