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Abstract

In his article "Wait upon Ishiguro, Englishness, and Class" Mustapha Marrouchi analyzes Kazuo Ishiguro's novels with focus on the writer's interest in Japanese culture and his preoccupation with matters of class in England. Marrouchi analyzes Ishiguro's novels as located astride of East, West, and the in-between: his precise, exquisitely made stories are shadowed by absences and silences, balanced "between elegy and irony" (Rushdie) and this is so whether the speaker is the obsessive butler in The Remains of the Day or one of the demented heroes in The Unconsoled or When We Were Orphans or the Japanese, guilty or exiled, in Ishiguro's first two novels A Pale View of Hills and An Artist of the Floating World.