Abstract

Librarians and their vendors were invited to a lively lunch discussion of the fate of books in midsize academic libraries. Do the monograph acquisition models advocated by many R-1 librarians at recent Charleston Conferences fit the needs of midsize academic libraries? These radical new models appear to assume almost full migration to e-books and include such strategies as wholesale movement to e-book-only approval; large leased e-book packages; and expansive DDA offerings of e-books in the catalog. Should midsize academic libraries, which are more often faced with unpredictable budget cycles, limited resources, and a different set of priorities, follow the R-1’s lead, or should they find monograph acquisition models better suited to their needs? Participants had the opportunity to explore these issues with the moderators’ guidance and to offer ideas on blending the best of the emerging R-1 models with the differing needs of midsize academic libraries.

DOI

10.5703/1288284315305

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Are Midsize Academic Libraries on the Right E-Book Train?

Librarians and their vendors were invited to a lively lunch discussion of the fate of books in midsize academic libraries. Do the monograph acquisition models advocated by many R-1 librarians at recent Charleston Conferences fit the needs of midsize academic libraries? These radical new models appear to assume almost full migration to e-books and include such strategies as wholesale movement to e-book-only approval; large leased e-book packages; and expansive DDA offerings of e-books in the catalog. Should midsize academic libraries, which are more often faced with unpredictable budget cycles, limited resources, and a different set of priorities, follow the R-1’s lead, or should they find monograph acquisition models better suited to their needs? Participants had the opportunity to explore these issues with the moderators’ guidance and to offer ideas on blending the best of the emerging R-1 models with the differing needs of midsize academic libraries.